Signs of Sex Addiction

NGU, NSU, PID, Cervicitis

Non-Gonococcal Uritritis, NGU,also called Non-Specific Urethritis, NSU, is a sexually transmitted infection and is increasing the risk of inflammation of the urethra. This urogenital infection mostly affects men, and is caused by a variety of bacteria and viruses. The most common bacteria involved in NGU are Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and Mycoplasma genitalim. Some researchers link viruses such as common in Herpes simplex with NGU. Some causes of NGU are not yet identified.

SEXUAL TRANSMISSION

Transmission occurs with vaginal or anal sex without a condom.

PREVENTION

The use of condoms is the best source of prevention.

TREATMENT

Due to the vast variety of possible causes for infection, your urologist might start you on a broadband antibiotic. You might have to repeat tests, allowing for further specification of the cause of your infection. It is imperative that both, the infected person and their sexual partner(s) are tested and treated. Women who are infected with the organisms that cause NGU are at risk to developing cervicitis and pelvic inflammatory disease, PID. If left untreated, complications may arise in men and women, including infertility and epididymitis.

SYMPTOMS

In some cases no symptoms are present, and you might not be aware of your infection.

Symptoms in men include;

  • Testicles may be swollen or painful
  • Low fever and general un-wellness
  • Urination may be painful with stinging and burning sensations
  • Milky discharge from the penis
  • Tingling or itching sensations in penis

Symptoms in women include;

  • Painful urination with burning sensations
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge
  • Lower abdominal pain, painful sex

SEXUAL HEALTH COUNSELLING

Sex Addiction Australia offers sexual health counselling to individuals and couples living with NGU or PID. Please make a confidential appointment with Heide during AEST office hours and call (+61) 02 9380 4486 or email info@sexaddictionaustralia.com.au

   

Poll: Sexual Behaviours